Karol Galanciak - Ruby on Rails developer from Poland

Rails: Useful Patterns

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There’ve been a lot of discussions for several months about “The Rails Way” and problems associated with it - huge models with several thousands lines of code and no distinguishable responsibilities (User class which does everything related to users doesn’t tell much what the app does), unmaintainable callback hell and no domain objects at all. Fortunately, service objects (or usecases) and other forms of extracting logic from models have become quite mainstream recently. However, it’s not always clear how to use them all together without creating huge classes with tens of private methods and too many responsibilities. Here are some strategies you can use to solve these problems.

Automate to the Max: Instant Ubuntu Server Setup With Chef

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You’ve started developing new app and need server to deploy it. You can choose hosting platform like Heroku or Shelly which may turn out to be quite expensive if you want to host multiple apps. You can also set up your own server. Going with the latter option can be quite time consuming, especially if sysadministration is not you main responsibility and you have multiple servers to provision. I that case automation beyond simple Bash scripts is a must - time to meet Chef.

You Don’t (Necessarily) Need Gem for That Feature

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You are working currently on that awesome app and just started thinking about implementing new feature, let’s call it feature X. What’s the first thing you do? Rolling your own solution or… maybe checking if there’s a magical gem that can help you solve that problem? Ok, it turns out there’s already a gem Y that does what you expect. Also, it does tons of other things and is really complex. After some time your app breaks, something is definitively not working and it seems that gem Y is responsible for that. So you read all the issues on Github, pull requests and even read the source code and finally find a little bug. You managed to do some monkeypatching first and then send pull request for a small fix and solved a problem, which took you a few hours. Looks like a problem is solved. And then, you try to update Rails to2 the current version. Seems like there’s a dependency problem - gem Y depends on previous version of Rails…

Test Driven Rails - Part 2

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Last time, in part 1, I was giving some advice about testing - why to test at all, which tests are valuable and which are not, when to write acceptance tests and in what cases aim for the maximum code coverage. It brought about some serious discussion about testing ideas and if you haven’t read it yet, you should probably check (it) it out. Giving some general point of view about such broad topic like Test Driven Development / Behavior Driven Development is definetely not enough so I will try to apply these techniques by implementing a concrete feature. I wanted to choose some popular usecase so that most developers will have an opinion how they would approach it. In most applications you will probably need:

Test Driven Rails – Part 1

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Testing is still one of the hottest topics when it comes to developing maintainable and business-critical applications. Ruby on Rails community embraces the importance of writings tests, yet there are so little resources about the Test-Driven Development or Behavior-Driven Development in Rails applications from a wider perspective. How should we test our application? Which tests are valuable and which don’t provide any value? What scenarios should be included in acceptance tests?

Structuring Rails Applications

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There’ve been a lot of discussions recently about applying Object Oriented Programming in Rails applications, how ActiveRecord callbacks make testing painful and how Rails makes it hard to do OOP the right way. Is it really true? Rails makes everything easy - you can easily write terrible code, which will be a maintenance nightmare, but is also easy to apply good practices, especially with available gems. What is the good way then to extract logic in Rails applications and the best place to put it?

CentOS 6.4 Server Setup With Ruby on Rails, Nginx and PostgreSQL

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Server setup with the entire environment for Rails applications can be quite tricky, especially when you do it for the first time. Here is step by step guide how to setup CentOS 6.4 server with a basic environment for deploying Rails applications. I encourage you to choose CentOS Linux - it is a reliable distro (well, based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux), easy to handle and doesn’t require advanced Unix knowledge like Gentoo (especially while updating system related stuff).