Blog Archive

2021

2020

Kafka for Rubyists Mini Course

I’ve been recently planning to record a couple of tutorials for my team in BookingSync, focusing mostly on monitoring and some other more advanced aspects of Kafka and Karafka. But if I was already recording something, then why not make it available publicly so that more developers could benefit from it? So, in the end, I decided to make a bit more effort and recorded this mini-course, which will be available for everyone, for free ;).

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Race Conditions on Rails

Imagine that you are implementing a payment processing system for the e-commerce system and discover that multiple customers were charged twice for exactly the same order. Ouch… Sounds like a real nightmare to deal with! And the next day, you see that something is not right with the credits system in which users were able to pay using special credits instead of using credit card - somehow instead of getting charged $100 in total for two orders of $25 and $75, they were charged just 25$! And to make it even more epic, it turned out that the uniqueness validation you added didn’t work at all, and now you have three users with the same email address!

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A Secret Weapon For Your Rails Apps - RPC with RabbitMQ and Hutch

Communication between two or more applications is often everyday stuff, and it might seem that there is not too much to add there as this subject has been covered pretty well in the last years. Thanks to that, multiple patterns and standards have emerged. You no longer need to think about how the response format should look like for your REST API (go with JSONAPI and stick to the conventions) or figure out the authentication/authorization protocol (go with OAuth and the security headaches won’t bother you).

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2019

From ActiveRecord callbacks to Publish/Subscribe pattern and event-driven design

Imagine that you are working on a large legacy application that also contains the dreaded ActiveRecord callbacks in the models handling most of the business logic. At some point, and under a certain level complexity, the mess caused by that choice might become hard to keep under control, the risk of introducing bugs will increase and the teams(s) working on the application will be way less productive. That will most likely lead to an attempt to find a better way of designing the application. The problem, though, might be that the scope of the application is so huge that introducing any meaningful changes to the application will take weeks, if not months.

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Durable Sidekiq jobs: how to maximize reliability of Sidekiq and Redis

Sidekiq is one of the most popular (if not the most popular one) background job framework in Ruby world, which is not a big surprise: it allows to achieve a decent throughput, is stable and well-maintained, has some great features (including also all the gems extending its built-in functionality) and is easy to get started with. It seems like you could simply install Redis, add Sidekiq to your application and you are good to go!

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Messages on Rails Part 3: RabbitMQ

In the first part of this series, we were exploring some potential options for communication between services - what their advantages and disadvantages are, why HTTP API is not necessarily the best possible choice and suggesting that asynchronous messaging might be a better solution, using, e.g. RabbitMQ and Kafka. We’ve already covered Kafka in the part 2, now it’s the time for RabbitMQ.

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Messages on Rails Part 2: Kafka

In the first part of this series, we were exploring some potential options for communication between services - what their advantages and disadvantages are, why HTTP API is not necessarily the best possible choice and suggesting that asynchronous messaging might be a better solution, using, e.g. RabbitMQ and Kafka. Let’s focus this time entirely on the latter.

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Messages on Rails Part 1 - Introduction to Kafka and RabbitMQ

Microservices, Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) and in general, distributed ecosystems, have been on hype in the last several years. And that’s for a good reason! At certain point, The Majestic Monolith “pattern” might start causing issues, both from the purely technical reasons like scalability, tight coupling of the code if you don’t follow Domain-Driven Design or some other practices improving modularity, maintenance overhead, and also from organizational perspective since working in smaller teams on smaller apps is more efficient than working with huge team on an even bigger monolith which suffers from tight coupling and low cohesion. However, this is only true if the overall architecture addresses the potential problems that are common in the micro/macro-services world. One of these problems I would like to focus on is communication between apps and how the data flows between them.

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How to tell the difference between a default and a provided value for optional arguments in Ruby?

It is sometimes required for the methods with optional arguments to be able to differentiate between its default value and the value passed from the caller. Passing nil might initially sound like a good idea since it represents “nothingness”. However, it might turn out that nil is a legit value and there might be cases where it is desirable for the caller to pass nil. In such a case, we cannot use it as a default value if we want to implement a special logic for the case of not providing that value.

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2018

Inheritance and define_method - how to make them work together

Imagine that you are implementing some form object because you are fed up with treating ActiveRecord models as such, and you need some extra flexibility. You start with a straightforward implementation for a base class of a form object where you can just whitelist attributes. That could look like this:

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The Problems With Validating ActiveRecord Models And Why State Validation Is a Bad Idea

In the typical Rails application, you can find the most of the validations in the ActiveRecord models, which is nothing surprising - ActiveRecord models are used for multiple things. Whether it is a good thing, or a bad thing (in most cases it’s the latter) deserves a separate book or at least blog post-series as it’s not a simple problem, there is one specific thing that can cause a lot of issues that are difficult to solve and go beyond design decisions and ease of maintenance of the application, something that impacts the behavior of the model - the validations.

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Indexes on Rails: How to make the most of your Postgres database

Optimizing database queries is arguably one of the fastest ways to improve the performance of the Rails applications. There are multiple ways how you can approach it, depending on the kind of a problem. N+1 queries seem to be a pretty common issue, which is, fortunately, easy to address. However, sometimes you have some relatively simple-looking queries that seem to take way longer than they should be, indicating that they might require some optimization. The best way to improve such queries is adding a proper index.

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Rails And Conditional Validations In Models

Adding consents for accepting Terms of Service/Privacy Policies must have been a top popular feature in the majority of the applications due to enforcement of GDPR in May ;). From the technical aspects that GDPR requires, there is a proof of consent for processing the personal information. In that case, you need to have some actual attributes in the database that would confirm the fact that some user has indeed accepted Terms of Service/Privacy Policy.

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The Case for before_validation callback: complex state normalization

Few months ago I wrote a blog post about ActiveRecord before_validation callback and how it is used for wrong reasons and concluded that in most cases this is not something we should be using routinely. However, I missed one appropriate use case for it which might be quite common in Rails apps, so this might be an excellent opportunity to get back to before_validation callback and show its other side.

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Advanced Ember Data Customization - Different Model Types in Ember App and API For The Same Resource

A great advantage of using Ember Data with JSONAPI-compliant adapters/serializers is that there is almost nothing extra needed to work with the data layer - just create the models with names matching the types of the resources returned by the API and you are good to go! However, sometimes you may need to customize the naming which means that the names of the models in the Ember application will be different than the ones expected by the API and their corresponding types. What are the steps required to make it work in Ember Data?

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2017

The aesthetics of Ruby - Kernel#itself method

Recently, I’ve had quite a popular problem to solve: count the occurences of the given item in a collection. There are few ways to solve this problem - starting from using Enumerable#inject or Enumerable#each_with_object with an empty hash as an accumulator value and writing a code looking like this:

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Traps on Rails - Overriding boolean methods in models

One very useful feature of ActiveRecord is automatically defining attribute readers and writers for all the columns for given tables. For the ones with boolean type, however, there is one more addition - defining an alias of the method with a question mark. Sometimes it might be useful to override this method and add some extra requirements for a given condition. However, this might not be such a good idea.

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The Case Against Exotic Usage of :before_validate Callbacks

It’s nothing new that ActiveRecord callbacks are abused in many projects and used for the wrong reasons for many use cases where they can be easily avoided in favor of a much better alternative, like service objects. There is one callback though that is special and quite often used for pretty exotic reasons that have nothing to do with the process when it gets executed - it’s the before_validate callback.

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Do. Or do not. There is no try - Object#try considered harmful

Object#try is quite a commonly used method in Rails applications to cover cases where there is a possibility of dealing with a nil value or to provide flexible interface for handling cases where some kind of object doesn’t necessarily implement given method. Thanks to try, we may avoid getting NoMethodError. So it seems like it’s perfect, right? No NoMethodError exception, no problem?

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5 years of professional Ruby and Rails development - My Reflections

As hard as it is for me to believe, I already have over 5 years of professional experience in Ruby and Rails. Throughout all these years my attitude towards Rails has been fluctuating between going from blind love to harsh critic (ActiveRecord, I’m looking at you) ending with a bit more balanced but certainly a positive approach. Such time is long enough to have a meaningful opinion about the overall experience using any framework, so here are few points about Rails that I would particularly like to focus on in my reflections.

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Ember Tips: Testing Outgoing HTTP Requests

Ember.js is a web frontend framework and it’s no surprise that majority of the applications deal with a lot of HTTP requests. But such fact has a lot of implications on the process of development of the Ember apps, especially when it comes to testing. For basic GET requests which don’t include any query params or don’t deal with pagination it’s quite straight-forward - for those we just want to fetch some data, so we can check if proper objects are present as a side-effect of these requests. What about POST, PATCH or DELETE requests, where we can’t easily test the side effects?

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Ruby Memoization: ||= vs. defined? syntax

In the majority of the Rails applications or even Ruby gems you can find a lot of use cases where you need to memoize a result of some computation for performance benefits and to not compute it again if this result has already been computed. Seems like doing the assignment to some instance variable with ||= operator is the most commonly used solution for this purpose, e.g. @result ||= do_some_heavy_computation. However, there are some cases where it might not produce the expected outome and you should actually use defined? operator instead.

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Ember Tips: Managing Timeouts And Delays

Timeouts and delays are quite extensively used in many applications when deferring execution of some action via Ember.run.later or debouncing via Ember.run.debounce. Having small amounts of tests executing such methods might not be a problem initially, but obviously, as the application grows, this can easily lead to slow test suite which takes minutes to finish due to the waiting for all the timeouts and delays in many places. Let’s try to find the best solution to solve this problem.

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JavaScript Tips: Redefining userAgent property

Imagine a use case where you are trying to check if a user accessed your app from a mobile device or not. Most likely you will need to use navigator.userAgent property and craft some smart regular expression to test for the presence of particular expression, like (/Mobi/.test(navigator.userAgent) which seems to be the recommended way to do it. Ok, so we’re almost done with our feature, we just need to add some tests to make sure it works as expected. But there’s a problem - you can’t redefine userAgent property with just using a setter! Fortunately, there is a way to solve this problem.

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JavaScript: The Surprising Parts

Do you think you know all the surprising parts of JavaScript? Some of these "features" may look as if the language was broken, but it's not necessarily the case. Things like variables hoisting, variables scope, behaviour of this are quite intentional and besides just being different from most of other programming languages, there is nothing particularly wrong with them. However, there are still some things that are quite surprising about JavaScript. Let's take a look at some of them.

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2016

Ember Tips: Computed Properties And Arrow Functions? Not A Good Idea

Arrow function expressions were definitely a great addition in ES6 and thanks to tools like babel the new syntax has been quite widely adopted. Besides more concise syntax, an interesting thing about arrow function expressions is that they preserve the context, i.e. they don't define their own this, which was sometimes annoying and resulted in assigning that or self variables to keep the outer context that could be referred inside functions. As great as it sounds, arrow function expressions cannot be used in all cases. One example would be Ember computed properties.

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Introduction to ActiveRecord and ActiveModel Attributes API

Rails 5.0 is without a doubt a great release with plenty of useful changes and additions. The most notable change was probably ActionCable - the layer responsible for integrating your app with websockets. However, there were also other additions that could bring some substantial improvements to your Rails apps, but were a bit outshined by bigger changes. One of such features is Attributes API.

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Keeping Data Integrity In Check: Conditional Unique Indexes For Soft Delete

Soft delete is a pretty common feature in most of the applications. It may increase complexity of the queries, nevertheless, not deleting anything might be a right default as the data might prove to be useful in the future: for restoring if a record was removed by mistake, to derive some conclusions based on statistics and plenty of other purposes. It may seem like it's a pretty trivial thing: just adding a column like deleted_at and filtering out records that have this value present. But what happens when you need to do some proper uniqueness validation on both model layer and database level? Let's take a look what kind of problem can easily be overlooked and how it can be solved with a conditional index.

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Decoding Rails Magic: How Does ActiveJob work?

Executing background jobs is quite a common feature in many of the web applications. Switching between different background processing frameworks used to be quite painful as most of them had different API for enqueuing jobs, enqueuing mailers and scheduling jobs. One of the great addition in Rails 4.2 was a solution to this problem: ActiveJob, which provides extra layer on top of background jobs framework and unifies the API regardless of the queue adapter you use. But how exactly does it work? What are the requirements for adding new queue adapters? What kind of API does ActiveJob provide? Let’s dive deep into the codebase and answer these and some other questions.

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Little-known but useful Rails features: ActiveRecord.extending

Every now and then I discover some features in Rails that are not that (arguably) commonly used, but there are some use cases when they turn out to be super useful and the best tool for the job. One of them would definitely be a nice addition to ActiveRecord::QueryMethods - extending method. Let’s see how it could be used in the Rails apps.

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Decoding Rails Magic: How Does Calling Class Methods On Mailers Work

Have you ever wondered how it is possible that calling class methods on mailers work in Rails, even though you only define some instance methods in those classes? It seems like it’s quite common question, especially when you see the mailers in action for the first time. Apparently, there is some Ruby "magic" involved here, so let’s try to decode it and check what happens under the hood.

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Scaling Up Rails Applications With PostgreSQL Table Partitioning - Part 1

You've probably heard many times that the database is the bottleneck of many web applications. This isn't necessarily true. Often it happens that some heavy queries can be substiantially optimized, making them really efficient and fast. As the time passes by, however, the data can remarkably grow in size, especially in several years time which can indeed make the database a bottleneck - the tables are huge and don't fit into memory any longer, the indexes are even bigger making queries much slower and you can't really optimize further any query. In many cases deleting old records that are no longer used is not an option - they still can have some value, e.g. for data analysis or statystical purposes. Fortunately, it's not a dead end. You can make your database performance great again with a new secret weapon: table partitioning.

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When validation is not enough: PostgreSQL triggers for data integrity

Is validation in your models or form objects enough to ensure integrity of the data? Well, seems like you can't really persist a record when the data is not valid unless you intentionally try to bypass validation using save: false option when calling save or using update_column. What about uniqueness validation? A classic example would be a unique email per user. To make sure the email is truly unique we could add a unique index in database - not only would it prevent saving non-unique users when bypassing validation, but also it would raise extra error when 2 concurrent requests would attempt to save user with the same email. However, some validations are more complex that ensuring a value is unique and index won't really help much. Fortunately, PostgreSQL is powerful enough to provide a perfect solution to such problem. Time to meet your new friend: PostgreSQL triggers.

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Security On Rails: Hacking Sessions With Insecure Secret Key Base

I was recently asked what is secret key base used for in Rails applications and why not secure value of it (or even worse - the public one!) creates a security issue. That was a really good question, I remember how it was a serious threat years ago, especially before introducing secrets.yml in Rails 4.1 - at that time by default secret_token initializer was generated and the secret key was directly stored there. The result was that in many open source projects secret key was publicly available creating a great security risk. Let's take a look how exposed secret key base could be exploited.

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PostgreSQL In Action: Sorting With NULLIF Expression

Ordering with ActiveRecord and PostgreSQL may seem like an obvious and simple thing: in most cases you just specify one or several criteria with direction of ordering like order(name: :asc) and that's all, maybe in more complex scenarios you would need to use CASE statement to provide some more customized conditions. But how could we approach sorting with forcing blank values to be the last ones, regardless of the direction of the sort? You might be thinking now about NULLS LAST statement for this purpose, but that's not going to handle empty string. For this case you need something special: time to meet NULLIF conditional expression.

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Implementing non-RESTful actions with Ember Data

In my recent post I mentioned some strategies of handling non-strictly CRUD / RESTful actions in API. One of them was adding extra actions beyond creating, updating and deleting resources. As it's not a standard solution and some data layers on client side (like Ember Data) don't handle it out-of-box, I was asked by some developers what's the best way to handle such actions. So let's see how can we hack into Ember Data and make it smooth.

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How To Handle Non-CRUD Logic In Your API

If you happen to develop API for non-trivial app with complex business logic beyond CRUD directly mapped to the database tables (i.e. typical Active Record pattern) you were probably wondering many times how to handle these cases and what's the best way to do it. There are quite a few solutions to this problem: you could add another endpoint for handling given use case, add non-RESTful action to already existing endpoint or you can add a magic param to the payload that would force non-standard scenario in the API. Let's take a closer look at the these solutions and discuss some advantages and disadvantages of each of them.

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Refactoring Tips: Trade Conditionals For Type Delegation

Having some kind of type attribute in your models is a pretty common thing, especially in applications with more complex domain. How do you handle such cases? Is it with multiple conditionals / case statements in every method dealing with the type attribute? If you've been struggling with organizing and maintaing code for such use cases then say hello to your new friend: type delegation.

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2015

Ember and ES7: async / await

In the previous blog post we were exploring a new wonderful feature coming with ECMAScript 7: decorators. This time we are going to learn about async / await, which is at this moment at Stage 3 in TC39 process, which means it's already a release candidate that passed Proposal and Draft stages. Just like decorators, it's already available in Babel. Let's see what kind of benefits does it offer.

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Ember and ES7: decorators

ES6 introduced plenty of useful features such as modules, arrow functions, let variables, destructuring, classes and many more which made writing JS code much readable and enjoyable. Thanks to Babel, a JavaScript transpiler, it's been pretty painless to use them all in the applications. If you happen to develop EmberJS apps and use ember-cli, you don't probably think much about Babel or any transpilation as these features are a natural part of every Ember application. But the new features didn't end with ES6, we're going to have even more of them in ES7 (2016). Some of them can already be used, thanks again to Babel. In this blogpost I'm going to explore a very powerful concept which of decorators.

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Embarking on Programming Journey

Recently I've been repeatedly asked how to get started with programming, especially Ruby and Rails. To keep things DRY and make sure I always include all great resources for learning, I decided to write this blog post. Most of people who asked me had never programmed before or had done some coding before in other languages, but are not (yet) proficient developers, so if you are a total beginner or just started learning Ruby / Rails and you are not sure what the next step is then you came to the right place.

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Model your domain with composed models

In many Rails applications the modeling is limited only to creating classes inheritng from ActiveRecord::Base which are 1:1 mapped to database tables. Having AR models like User and Project doesn't tell much about the domain of your application. Well, you can add some domain logic to the models but that way you will easily end up having giant classes with thousands lines of code, so let's just use models for database-related stuff only. Other option would be to create service objects for every usecase. That's a good and clean way, but it's merely the interaction layer between different parts of your application. You may end up easily with all logic encapsulated within service objects that will start looking more like procedural programming rather than proper OOP and not real domain API at all. The good news is that you can easily counteract it: time to use composed models.

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2014

Rails: Useful Patterns

There've been a lot of discussions for several months about "The Rails Way" and problems associated with it - huge models with several thousands lines of code and no distinguishable responsibilities (User class which does everything related to users doesn't tell much what the app does), unmaintainable callback hell and no domain objects at all. Fortunately, service objects (or usecases) and other forms of extracting logic from models have become quite mainstream recently. However, it's not always clear how to use them all together without creating huge classes with tens of private methods and too many responsibilities. Here are some strategies you can use to solve these problems.

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Automate to the max: instant Ubuntu Server setup with Chef

You've started developing new app and need server to deploy it. You can choose hosting platform like Heroku or Shelly which may turn out to be quite expensive if you want to host multiple apps. You can also set up your own server. Going with the latter option can be quite time consuming, especially if sysadministration is not you main responsibility and you have multiple servers to provision. I that case automation beyond simple Bash scripts is a must - time to meet Chef.

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You don't (necessarily) need gem for that feature

You are working currently on that awesome app and just started thinking about implementing new feature, let's call it feature X. What's the first thing you do? Rolling your own solution or... maybe checking if there's a magical gem that can help you solve that problem? Ok, it turns out there's already a gem Y that does what you expect. Also, it does tons of other things and is really complex. After some time your app breaks, something is definitively not working and it seems that gem Y is responsible for that. So you read all the issues on Github, pull requests and even read the source code and finally find a little bug. You managed to do some monkeypatching first and then send pull request for a small fix and solved a problem, which took you a few hours. Looks like a problem is solved. And then, you try to update Rails to2 the current version. Seems like there's a dependency problem - gem Y depends on previous version of Rails...

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Test Driven Rails - Part 2

Last time, in part 1, I was giving some advice about testing - why to test at all, which tests are valuable and which are not, when to write acceptance tests and in what cases aim for the maximum code coverage. It brought about some serious discussion about testing ideas and if you haven't read it yet, you should probably check (it) it out. Giving some general point of view about such broad topic like Test Driven Development / Behavior Driven Development is definetely not enough so I will try to apply these techniques by implementing a concrete feature. I wanted to choose some popular usecase so that most developers will have an opinion how they would approach it. In most applications you will probably need:

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Test Driven Rails – Part 1

Testing is still one of the hottest topics when it comes to developing maintainable and business-critical applications. Ruby on Rails community embraces the importance of writings tests, yet there are so little resources about the Test-Driven Development or Behavior-Driven Development in Rails applications from a wider perspective. How should we test our application? Which tests are valuable and which don’t provide any value? What scenarios should be included in acceptance tests?

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2013

Structuring Rails applications

There’ve been a lot of discussions recently about applying Object Oriented Programming in Rails applications, how ActiveRecord callbacks make testing painful and how Rails makes it hard to do OOP the right way. Is it really true? Rails makes everything easy - you can easily write terrible code, which will be a maintenance nightmare, but is also easy to apply good practices, especially with available gems. What is the good way then to extract logic in Rails applications and the best place to put it?

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CentOS 6.4 server setup with Ruby On Rails, Nginx and PostgreSQL

Server setup with the entire environment for Rails applications can be quite tricky, especially when you do it for the first time. Here is step by step guide how to setup CentOS 6.4 server with a basic environment for deploying Rails applications. I encourage you to choose CentOS Linux - it is a reliable distro (well, based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux), easy to handle and doesn't require advanced Unix knowledge like Gentoo (especially while updating system related stuff).

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